Build-Climbing-Rock-Wall-and-a-Slide-for-Backyard-Playground

How to Build a Backyard Climbing Rock Wall And a Slide For Kids

Do you wish to build backyard playground a climbing rock wall with a slide for your kids? Here Step by step tutorial how to build a climbing wall and a slide for kids.

How to Build a Climbing Rock Wall And a Slide For Kids

Build-Climbing-Rock-Wall-and-a-Slide-for-Backyard-Playground

Tools Needed:

  • A miter saw is required
  • I cut all of the 2x4s with a miter saw, but you could also use a circular saw.
  • Impact Wrench
  • Drill
  • Use 1/4′′ and 3/4′′ drill bits.
  • Pocket gap
  • hammer and nail
  • Speed multiplied by two
  • Tape Measuring
  • FinishMax paint sprayer (optional)

Supplies Needed to Build a Climbing Rock Wall And a Slide :

  • Slide
  • Rock climbing grips
  • Pressure-treated wood with ground contact
  • 8′ planks 2×24
  • Regular wood (it will last for years if painted/sealed on the outside)
  • five (16-foot) boards
  • three boards measuring 26 feet
  • 8 blue-kote pocket hole screws (2 1/2′′)
  • 20 TimberLOK 2 1/2′′ wood screws in total
  • 1 1/2′′ gold screws (leftover from wall building)
  • Exterior wood glue
  • Wood stain (leftover from deck construction)
  • Deck construction leftover outdoor wood sealer
  • I prefer to use Spar Urethane for fantastic sun and weather protection. I’ve used them here and here, and they’re still in perfect condition.
  • Exterior painting (leftover from wall construction)
  • I painted the inside of the playhouse in Ultra White by Behr and the outside in Aqua Rapids by Behr.

Building The Climbing Rock Wall

We began by cutting the 16 boards to the upper wall width (34 1/2′′).To cover the entire wall, we required nine boards. With our paint sprayer, we sanded and painted the backs and sides of these boards white.

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When they were dry, we hung them using 1 1/2-inch gold screws and wood glue. Each board received two screws into each stud.

Continue up to the top of the wall. It actually finished about 3/4″ below the top, but it is barely visible.

Following installation, I opted to paint the turquoise on the outside. Taping off the deck area and rolling the color on with a little roller was a breeze.

Then I decided to disguise and protect the screw holes by filling them with caulk. So I quickly grabbed some leftover caulk and plugged in all the gaps. They were almost unnoticeable after a second coat of paint.

Installing Lower Section of the climbing wall

For the lower section of the climbing wall, I cut the 26 boards to 5′ length.Then I sanded and stained everything.

I also applied a coat of spar urethane sealer to the back and sides of all the boards before mounting them to ensure that the sides of each board were well-sealed. When you just have a 1/4-inch gap between them, it can be difficult to seal.

I used 2 1/2′′ TimberLOK wood screws to fasten these boards to the deck’s sides. You could probably use deck screws instead, but I got a package of 50 and have plenty left over. And I enjoy how strong they are.

I applied a coat of sealant to the front of the boards once I finished installing them all. Then, once everything was dry, a second coat was applied to the front, back, and sides.

The rock climbing handles could now be added. Four of the ten handles were added to the top portion of the wall. This makes it easier for the kids to climb up to the aperture.I positioned them where I wanted them and marked the holes where they would be installed.I bored a 1/4-inch hole into the wood.

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The tee nut was hammered into the back of the wood over the 1/4-inch hole. I found it difficult to grip the tee nut while hammering it in, but using a screw driver allowed me to grasp it and pound it.

All that’s left to do is use the Allen wrench to tighten the bolts on the handles.

I discovered that the bolts that came with the handles were just long enough for 1-inch thick wood at the bottom of the climbing wall. I tried and failed to find longer screws at my local Home Depot. But I had a simple solution.

I used a 3/4′′ drill bit to make a 1/2′′ deep hole in the back of the board after drilling the 1/4′′ holes where I wanted them.This made my wood only 1 inch thick, which made it easy to attach the handles.

My children had also requested a ladder. I didn’t want to make stairs, so I made a basic rope ladder. I used about 15 feet of 1/4″ rope and a 1″ dowel.

They can now compete to see who can get inside the playhouse quicker by climbing the ladder or climbing the climbing wall.

Building the Slide

The slide (which I purchased) was a tad flimsier than I had hoped. I knew this going in because I had read SO MANY REVIEWS. So I was already planning on strengthening the slide using 2x4s.

Getting the angles of the slide reinforcement right took some trial and error. Our yard has a slight incline, but I’ll explain what angles worked for us so you can get a starting point whether you’re putting in a slope or not.

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I chose pressure treated 24 inch boards for the slide because they would be lying on our grass and would get wet every time we irrigated it.

I cut two 7-inch-long pieces for the bottom, each with a 25-degree angle cut on one end. Then I cut two 79-inch sections with a 38-degree top angle and a 25-degree bottom angle. I also trimmed a couple inches off the top of the piece so it wouldn’t protrude too much from the deck (but a little bit was needed).

I used my pocket hole to link the bottom piece to the top piece, which was then fastened to the playhouse deck. They were spaced 13 inches apart (I measured the groove in the slide for this measurement). Then I placed the slide on top of the 2x4s and was astonished that it fit!

Drill holes on the top of the slide to fasten it to the deck, and then use the provided screws to secure the slide to the deck.

It’s finally time to have some fun! While the slide remains narrow on my hips, it can now support the weight of an adult. And don’t expect the youngsters to go down (or up) one at a time! The strengthening was clearly required.

I hope you found my tutorial on How to Build a Backyard Playground with a Climbing Rock Wall and a Slide for Kids to be helpful. If you’re looking for more ideas for creating a lovely and engaging playground for your children, go no further than these backyard playground ideas. Also read how to build a backyard wooden balance beam for your kids.